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Quit Smoking Is Good For Your Oral Health

Adults who are current smokers are four times more likely as those who've never smoked to have poor oral health status and twice as likely to have had three or more oral health problems, according to a new report issued by the National Center for Health Statistics, part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 
The report, "Smoking and Oral Health in Dentate Adults aged 18-64," says that current smokers not only have a poorer oral health status and more oral health problems than former smokers and those who've never smoked; they also are less likely to visit a dental health professional when experiencing a dental problem because they were unable to afford dental care.
 
The report highlights findings from the 2008 National Health Interview Survey, which examined differences among dentate current smokers, former smokers and never smokers ages 18 to 64 in terms of oral health status, number of oral health problems and the utilization of dental equipment.
 
Key findings from the report include:
 
Current smokers (16 percent) were twice as likely as former smokers (8 percent) and four times as likely as never smokers (4 percent) to have poor oral health status.
 
Current smokers (35 percent) were almost one and one-half times as likely as former smokers (24 percent) and more than two times as likely as never smokers (16 percent) to have had three or more oral health problems.
 
Current smokers (19 percent) were about twice as likely as former smokers (9 percent) and never smokers (10 percent) to have not had a dental visit in more than 5 years or have never had one.
 
"The evidence for an association between tobacco use and oral diseases has been clearly shown in every Surgeon General's report on tobacco since 1964," said the report summary. "Tobacco use is a risk factor for oral cancers, periodontal diseases and dental caries, among other diseases. Oral health problems may be early warning signs of other medical problems such as diabetes, HIV, heart disease or stroke. Good oral health is integral to good general health."If you a heavy smoker, you must use the teeth whitening machine to protect your teeth.
 
"Our findings are in line with other studies that have identified smoking as a strong lifestyle factor affecting oral health," said Dr. Muneo Tananka, study author. "However, studies that have looked at hours of sleep as an independent factor affecting periodontal health are limited. From this study, we can speculate that shortage of sleep can impair the body's immune response, which may lead to the progression of diseases such as periodontal disease."
 
Smoking, they concluded, may suppress the host-defense system, which may promote periodontal disease progression.